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    education, research & outreach

    Our mission is to promote the value of the unique environments of the LowCountry region of South Carolina.

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Browse Our Nature Notes

  • On a recent field trip, our master naturalist class was treated to something really neat.

  • Monarchs are not the only butterflies to migrate through our area this time of year. 

  • I think most of you guys realize that I have a real fondness for sharks!

  • As a kid, about this time of year, my friends and I would collect mistletoe to sell door to door in the neighborhood.

  • For this nature note...I thought it would be interesting to relate a story that happened to us one evening.

  • The other white meat!

  • am generally not one to "anthropomorphize" animals but this  experience from a few years ago really got me thinking.

  • I sat on the edge of the jon boat balancing myself as I donned fins and a mask preparing to snorkel after my elusive quarry. 

  • I sure remember the first time I got really "tagged" by a blue crab. 

  • I realize a few of you guys have heard this before but...I just love this story!

  • The Biting of the Shrew!

  • I never claimed to be a bat expert, but when I was called one afternoon to check out a large colony from a nearby residence, I jumped at the opportunity. 

  • Researching Monarchs
    Research Projects

    Researching Monarchs

    Monarch butterfly populations are at historically low levels; citizen science projects focusing on presence of monarch caterpillars over time and space as well as monarch overwintering behavior on the SC coast will help provide much needed information about this species in peril.

    In 2015-2016, the LCI participated in two citizen science programs focused on helping to understand and restore monarch butterflies.

  • Fish Music
    Research Projects

    Fish Music

    In April 2016, Dr. Eric Montie (biology professor at USCB) and his students began a fish research project thanks to a grant from the LCI.

    The research team has been maintaining underwater hydrophones deployed in two locations in Chechessee Creek and one in the Great Salt Pond on Spring Island. Monthly recordings are downloaded from the hydrophones and analyzed for fish spawning calls, which can be recognized by species based on the sonography patterns.